What Are New York Public Library’s Most Checked-out Books?

A rather surprising list from the NYPL!

Nicholas C. Rossis

I recently wrote about the welcome fact that in 2019, more Americans went to the library than to the movies. At a time when the 2021 US budget seeks to eliminate funding for libraries, this is wonderful news indeed. But what books do library patrons check out?

Ron Charles has explored this very question. As he reports in the Washington Post, The New York Public Library has just released the titles of the 10 most checked-out books in its 125-year history. Bestsellers may offer a snapshot of passing fads, but this remarkable list compiled from more than a century of circulation data is like a literary cardiogram of the nation’s beating heart.

The 10 most checked-out books in the New York Public Library’s history

Books-library | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

Here is the top-10 list:

  1. The Snowy Day,” by Ezra Jack Keats (1962)
  2. The Cat in the Hat,”…

View original post 246 more words

More Americans Go to the Library than to the Movies

It is very encouraging to see how popular libraries still are in the US.

Nicholas C. Rossis

I recently wrote about Millennial reading habits. It turns out that they do love books.

This is further supported by a new report by Literary Hub, that highlighted a surprising fact: in 2019, more Americans went to the library than to the movies.

As Dan Sheehan reports, a recent Gallup poll (the first such survey since 2001) found that visiting the local library remains by far the most popular cultural activity for Americans.

And Justin McCarthy of Gallup continues:

Visiting the library remains the most common cultural activity Americans engage in, by far. The average 10.5 trips to the library U.S. adults report taking in 2019 exceeds their participation in eight other common leisure activities. Americans attend live music or theatrical events and visit national or historic parks roughly four times a year on average and visit museums and gambling casinos 2.5 times annually. Trips to amusement or…

View original post 262 more words

Why a fearless Welsh journalist praised German work camps in 1933

Another viewpoint on unemployment in the 1930s, that features in a forthcoming film.

thelearningprofessor

Gareth Jones was a fearless investigative journalist, famous for his reports on the horrific famine that followed enforced collectivization in the Ukraine. He is the subject of a biography published by the Welsh Academic Press, but is now becoming familiar to a wider audience thanks tothe newly-released Mr Jones, a major film directed by the wonderful Agnieszka Holland, starring James Norton as Jones (and featuring part of Fife as his home town of Barry).

James Norton

jones

I first came across Jones in a rather different context, while researching for my study of British work camps. In a series of articles in spring 1933 for the Western Mail and South Wales News, Jones reported on his visits to German labour camps in February 1933, an experience that ‘impressed me deeply’.

Jones’ impressions of the German camps he visited were overwhelmingly positive. He compared the large scale of the…

View original post 539 more words

5 Things Millennials Look for in a Book

If Millennials are your target market, this is very useful information!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Frank Hamilton | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksAs they grow older, millennials are turning into quite a big market. Who better than Frank Hamilton, a millennial blogger and translator from Manchester, to answer some questions about them? Frank is a professional writing expert in such topics as blogging, digital marketing, and self-education. He also loves traveling and speaks Spanish, French, German and English.

5 Things Millennials Look for in a Book

What are Millennials looking for in a book? | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

Millennials make up a huge portion of the target audience for many modern authors. This is why it is so important to understand what they are looking for in a book to make it appealing to them. Here are five things millennials are looking for in a book.

#1 Available in Print

While it might seem obvious that younger generations would prefer digital books over print ones, many millennials, in fact, prefer reading physical books. This is just the first one of the many surprising preferences…

View original post 882 more words

Will Computer-generated Writing Replace the Human Kind?

Is computer-generated writing convincing yet? Food for thought here.

Nicholas C. Rossis

A Heaven for Toasters | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's bookFree on KU

You may recall my sci-fi romance, A Heaven For Toasters, taking place some 100 years in the future. Leo, the android protagonist, exhibits some distinctly human characteristics—including the ability to feel human emotions. But could Leo become a writer or poet?

The Economist recently shared an article cheekily called Don’t Fear the Writernator – a reference to literature’s terminator. What prompted this was the news that researchers have come up with a more powerful version of automated writing.

So, how afraid should we be? Is Leo about to compose a sonnet to woo Mika?

Automated Writing

Automated writing, in case you’re unfamiliar with the term, is best exemplified by Gmail’s Smart Reply feature. Gmail offers brief answers to routine emails. So, if someone asks you “shall we meet up for lunch?” Gmail suggests a variety of appropriate responses, for example, “Sure!”

More strikingly, Smart Compose kicks…

View original post 776 more words

The Female Librarians Who Delivered Books On Horseback

There was a time when books were delivered on horseback!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Dusty Old Thing recently published an article by Rose Heichelbech about The Fierce Female Librarians Who Delivered Books On Horseback During The Great Depression. While everyone’s heard of the Pony Express, this is a rarely-told story. If like me, you’d never heard it, here you are!

The New Deal’s Book Women

In the middle of the Great Depression, not only was America grappling with the tightening of just about every single household budget, but the nation was also poorly connected. At the time most rural areas were without basic services like electricity and running water. As such, these remote areas were often devoid of public institutions like libraries.

Some of the most isolated areas were nestled in the Appalachian area of Kentucky, among other locations. One of the many public programs initiated by FDR’s New Deal was the Works Progress Administration, which funded the Pack Horse Library Initiative. The…

View original post 714 more words

The Pros and Cons of Social Media

Could you use social media to promote your book? Choose wisely!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Social media book marketing | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

People often ask me, which social medium should I use for my promos?

While everyone suggests you use social media to promote your book, there are also some cons attached to their use. InSync Media, the awesome people I write for, recently published a post listing the pros and cons of using social media that compares the various media and explains how to best use each of them.

However, my experience has been that there’s no definitive answer to that question. Rayne Hall uses Twitter almost exclusively while I prefer my blog and am rarely on Twitter nowadays. Facebook works for some but not others. It all depends on your genre, whether you write fiction or non-fiction, and your idiosyncrasy.

As I always say, find what works for you and stick with it!

The Cons of Using Social Platforms

Being seen

The unavoidable truth is there are a lot…

View original post 558 more words